Wiring

Wiring was very easy, though a bit tedious. To make the job easier I completed all of the wiring before I put the top onto the bench work. As you can see there is a multitude of wire and did not want to crawl underneath while running wire overhead. These bones are too old.

As you can see there is a multitude of wire running under the bench work.

Wiring almost done before top went on.

As you can see there is a multitude of wire running under the bench work.

The XpressNet adapter.

I actually scored this wiring for no cost as the local road crew was working in our area and in their hast ripped up the phone lines along the side of the road. The detached bundles ended up in my neighbor’s yard where, as a favor, the road crew deposited 15 dump truck loads of dirt at the back of his new house which is under construction.

N scale model railroading, small n scale layout, model railroading bench work, lenz DCC, LZV100, LV101, N scale railroad planning, wiring model railroad

Free wire compliments of local road crew.

After getting permission, I went over and helped myself. Here’s the bundle resting on my work bench in the garage before untangling and clean up.

N scale model railroading, small n scale layout, model railroading bench work, lenz DCC, LZV100, LV101, N scale railroad planning

Three transformers make up the power source.

I started by placing the power supplies into the suspended shelf below the bench work. Both of the larger transformers are 15VAC – 5 amp units. The smaller transformer on the right is 9VAC – 2 amp. The Lenz LZV100 is attached to one of the larger transformers; the  LV101 to the other. The yellow and orange wiring exiting to the left go to the programming track from the PQ ports of LZV100. The black, yellow, green, and red bundle go to the XpressNet adapter. The LZV100 sends command information to the LV101 via the twisted black and brown wire pair. Feedback data goes the other way through the small yellow wire.

The green and white wires from the LZV100 go to the main line. The blue and black pair from the LV101 go to the switching block in the center of the layout. The panel on the far left distributes power to the stationary decoders and circuit breakers.

Power Distribution

N scale model railroading, small n scale layout, model railroading bench work, lenz DCC, LZV100, LV101, N scale railroad planning, wiring model railroad

Power distribution panels.

I used a couple of terminal blocks I had laying around from an earlier electrical endeavor. The panel on the left distributes power from the larger transformers to the tracks via the circuit breakers. The panel on the right sends power to the stationary decoders via the 2 amp transformer. There are two modules of decoders, each contain six decoders.

As you can see there is a multitude of wire running under the bench work. I actually scored this wiring for no cost as the local road crew was working in our area and in their hast ripped up the phone lines along the side of the road. The detached bundles ended up in my neighbor's yard where the road crew deposited 15 dump truck loads of dirt at the back of his new house which is under construction.

Stationary decoders to control switch motors.

12 switches are controlled from these decoders (Lenz LS 150). I kept track of which switch received which wire set by making my self a chart of color designations on my computer. From here the main power buses to the blocks went through the circuit breakers.

As you can see there is a multitude of wire running under the bench work.

Circuit breakers protect the decoders from shorts.

N scale model railroading, small n scale layout, model railroading bench work, lenz DCC, LZV100, LV101, N scale railroad planning, wiring model railroad

Circuit breakers deliver power to track blocks.

Each of the circuit breaker boards were “jumped” with a bit of wiring in the appropriate spot to increase the amps needed to trip them. I did not want them to break at too lower a amperage. These breakers are programmable, thus I could have given them their own address on the XpressNet network, and then programmed them to change the break amperage. Using the jumpers (not shown) was easier.

Once everything was wired together I turned on the power and gave it a test. Much to my amazement, everything worked as intended.

As you can see there is a multitude of wire running under the bench work.

Lenz modules glowing red, not blinking; all is good.

In the next post I’ll explain how a laid the track, starting with the cork roadbed. Thanks for stopping by.